Love Today!

 

“Shekar...Shekar...get up son, it is five.”

 

Shekar’s figure under the bedsheet gently moved.

 

“Mummy, please wake me up after half an hour. I went to bed late.” “Shekar...darling...get up son, it is five thirty.”

‘No way escaping this nagging,” Shekar cursed and slowly pulled himself up.

 

“In this house it is military regime.” Again he cursed under his breath. There was a steaming cup of coffee awaiting him on the table when he returned from  brushing his teeth. He started sipping the coffee in his left hand and with his right hand opened his book.

 

“Read your Bible and then take your book.” Mama’s gentle voice came floating from the kitchen.

 

“I can’t read the Bible now. I’ll make it up during holidays.” There was irritation in his voice.

 

“Shekar...”

 

Before mummy could speak, papa interfered. “Why don’t you leave him at peace, He’s not a child anymore. He knows what to do.”

 

An unbearably loud silence followed.

 

Shekar’s examinations were over by Friday and his friend Ravi invited him for a movie.

 

“The stupid woman will not leave me da.” “Who’s that stupid woman ya?”

“You know the jail warden.” “Who da? Your mum?”

“Even if I come home half an hour late from school she’ll throw a questionnaire at me. You think she’ll send me to a movie?”

 

House was hell for Shekar and time seemed to stand still.

 

“Shekar...please son, clean up your room. Why is it in such a mess?...Okay, come soon, dosai is hot.”

 

“Why do you worry about my room? It’s none of YOUR  business.” His reply was curt.

 

“What Shekar, would you not take care of your things at least? Fold your clothes and clean your cycle.” She tried to keep her voice down.

 

“Why are you nagging ma? Then what is a mother doing at home?” He almost exploded.

 

“How much can I do son? I have to go to school after finishing my chores.”

 

Shekar watched his mother’s silhouette waddling tiredly at a distance, umbrella in one hand wiping the sweat of her brow with the pallu of her sari.

 

“Chi,” he thought, “it is better to go to the hostel than suffocate at home.”

 

He knew pretty well that he would not enjoy the luxuries of a cycle and TV, if mummy didn’t hold a job. Why, even daily food would be a struggle. But he didn’t want to dwell on those thoughts.

 

When Shekar returned home from the foot-ball field it was almost dark. Mummy opened her hand bag and took out two pieces of cake for him - what she had salvaged for him of her share in somebody’s birthday celebration at school. Shekar had his tea and switched on the TV.

 

“Shekar, did you put on the bathroom light? Please put it off.”

 

“Maaa... can’t you do? Should I get up and come all the way to put it off? From morning you are peevish.”

 

The next day when Shekar got up from bed at seven, mummy was still in bed to his big  surprise.  Papa  and  his  sister  had  managed  to  make  a  terrible  breakfast.  He somehow swallowed it.

 

“Shekar, mummy is not well. I am taking her to the hospital. Take care of the house. We’ll be back soon.” Papa didn’t give any more information. He could hear his father’s soft voice consoling mum. “Why do you cry? I don’t think it will be anything serious. God will take care of everything. Relax.”

 

“Mummy, why do you cry? What’s happening to you?” Shekar wanted to scream. “How to ask? Did they think there is no use telling me?” A painful lump rose to his throat.

 

Mummy and papa returned from the hospital with tired faces. Finally papa broke the silence.

“The doctor says mummy has cancer and she must be operated as early a possible.” Shekar’s stomach turned...should he apologise to mummy for his crude behaviour?

Should he share his love for her some way? No, not now. It will look artificial. Let

mummy return from the hospital and let the new Shekar be a pleasant surprise for her, he planned.

 

Mummy  was  wheeled  into  the  theatre.  About  an  hour  later  an  emergency information  was  sent.  Mama’s heart  stopped, half-way through  the surgery.  They could not revive her.

 

“Ayyyooo, mummiee...” Shekar’s screams rent the air. “You left me without giving me a chance, mummieee. Will you not open your eyes for just a minute?” Shekar beat upon his breast and cried; his sister sobbed; his father wept with his head on his hands.

 

Mummy’s  enlarged  photograph  found  a place  on  the wall.  Her eyes  looked  at

Shekar lovingly but Shekar avoided her eyes.

 

His fingers played on the table-dust. He looked up— cobwebs! The dust he had not witnessed in sixteen years had gathered in sixteen days! All these days...mummy?

 

Shekar collected his clothes and went to the well to wash. After the Sunday Service when they returned home ma would cook and after lunch when everyone took a nap, he would hear her washing at the well. The memory of the sound gave him chest pain.

 

“Son, get up” - That voice was laid to rest. “Who will ever wake me up like that again?” Shekar thought. He felt his heart would burst. All the church friends said that God would not make a mistake. Even this is for good. Why did God snatch my mother away leaving my conscience to cry? What is the good in it? The house seemed empty. How she used to secretly put the cake pieces into her handbag and bring for him! The handbag, hanging on a nail swung gently in the breeze. Shekar felt like weeping on somebody’s shoulder.

 

Shekar joined a hostel. Now, exam or no exam he never started the day without reading the Bible or praying. Ragu became his friend.

 

“Hey Ragu, the senior gang is planning to go somewhere. Are you not joining?”

asked Shekar.

 

“The stupid woman will not leave me da.” It was like a whack on his chest for Shekar.

“What Ragu, what did you say? Who did you say?” Shekar’s voice trembled.

 

“One of the rules in our house is that we should not stay out after eight.” Ragu spat out the words.

 

Shekar threw his arms around Ragu’s shoulders. They both walked towards the college steps and seated themselves. Soon they were engrossed in serious talk.

 

Ragu’s life gradually turned around.

 

Ragu’s  mother  boasted,  “Since  Ragu  went  to  college  he  has  become  very responsible. He’s changed a lot. You know how much he loves me.”

 

Hearts changed...Lives  changed. God will not make a mistake. Out of Shekar’s sorrow was born something good!

 

The opportunity to share love is not any day, it is today!

 

 

  Address for Correspondence Contributions

Dr. Lilian Stanley
13 Church Colony
Vellore 632006, India
 +91 9843511943
  lilianstanley@gmail.com

Blessing Youth Mission

Blessing Youth Mission
13 Church Colony
Vellore 632006, India
 +91-416-2242943, +91-416-2248943
  hq@bymonline.org
  www.bymonline.org

For Donation & Contributions...

Home & NRE donors

Name: Blessing Youth Mission
Account Type: Current Account
A/c No.: 37268642054
Bank: State Bank of India
Branch: Siruthozhil,Vellore - 632 006
IFSC No.: SBIN0007274

Overseas Donors

Name: Blessing Youth Mission
A/c No.: 1074703964
Bank: Central Bank of India
Branch: Vellore
IFSC No.: CBIN0280887
MICR Code: 000016000
SWIFT Code: CBININBBMDR

Gulf Donors

A/c Name: T.Dickson Daniel Moses
Account Type: Saving Account
A/c No.: 35374362080
Bank: State Bank of India
Branch: Siruthozhil,Vellore - 632 006
IFSF: SBIN0007274

Click here for more options

  Blessing Literature Centre

To buy books written by Dr. Lilian Stanley, kindly reach to us in the follwing address

Blessing Literature Centre
21/11 West Coovam River Road,
Chintadripet,
Chennai 600 002, India.
 +91-44-28450411
  blc@bymonline.org

Love Today!

 

“Shekar...Shekar...get up son, it is five.”

 

Shekar’s figure under the bedsheet gently moved.

 

“Mummy, please wake me up after half an hour. I went to bed late.” “Shekar...darling...get up son, it is five thirty.”

‘No way escaping this nagging,” Shekar cursed and slowly pulled himself up.

 

“In this house it is military regime.” Again he cursed under his breath. There was a steaming cup of coffee awaiting him on the table when he returned from  brushing his teeth. He started sipping the coffee in his left hand and with his right hand opened his book.

 

“Read your Bible and then take your book.” Mama’s gentle voice came floating from the kitchen.

 

“I can’t read the Bible now. I’ll make it up during holidays.” There was irritation in his voice.

 

“Shekar...”

 

Before mummy could speak, papa interfered. “Why don’t you leave him at peace, He’s not a child anymore. He knows what to do.”

 

An unbearably loud silence followed.

 

Shekar’s examinations were over by Friday and his friend Ravi invited him for a movie.

 

“The stupid woman will not leave me da.” “Who’s that stupid woman ya?”

“You know the jail warden.” “Who da? Your mum?”

“Even if I come home half an hour late from school she’ll throw a questionnaire at me. You think she’ll send me to a movie?”

 

House was hell for Shekar and time seemed to stand still.

 

“Shekar...please son, clean up your room. Why is it in such a mess?...Okay, come soon, dosai is hot.”

 

“Why do you worry about my room? It’s none of YOUR  business.” His reply was curt.

 

“What Shekar, would you not take care of your things at least? Fold your clothes and clean your cycle.” She tried to keep her voice down.

 

“Why are you nagging ma? Then what is a mother doing at home?” He almost exploded.

 

“How much can I do son? I have to go to school after finishing my chores.”

 

Shekar watched his mother’s silhouette waddling tiredly at a distance, umbrella in one hand wiping the sweat of her brow with the pallu of her sari.

 

“Chi,” he thought, “it is better to go to the hostel than suffocate at home.”

 

He knew pretty well that he would not enjoy the luxuries of a cycle and TV, if mummy didn’t hold a job. Why, even daily food would be a struggle. But he didn’t want to dwell on those thoughts.

 

When Shekar returned home from the foot-ball field it was almost dark. Mummy opened her hand bag and took out two pieces of cake for him - what she had salvaged for him of her share in somebody’s birthday celebration at school. Shekar had his tea and switched on the TV.

 

“Shekar, did you put on the bathroom light? Please put it off.”

 

“Maaa... can’t you do? Should I get up and come all the way to put it off? From morning you are peevish.”

 

The next day when Shekar got up from bed at seven, mummy was still in bed to his big  surprise.  Papa  and  his  sister  had  managed  to  make  a  terrible  breakfast.  He somehow swallowed it.

 

“Shekar, mummy is not well. I am taking her to the hospital. Take care of the house. We’ll be back soon.” Papa didn’t give any more information. He could hear his father’s soft voice consoling mum. “Why do you cry? I don’t think it will be anything serious. God will take care of everything. Relax.”

 

“Mummy, why do you cry? What’s happening to you?” Shekar wanted to scream. “How to ask? Did they think there is no use telling me?” A painful lump rose to his throat.

 

Mummy and papa returned from the hospital with tired faces. Finally papa broke the silence.

“The doctor says mummy has cancer and she must be operated as early a possible.” Shekar’s stomach turned...should he apologise to mummy for his crude behaviour?

Should he share his love for her some way? No, not now. It will look artificial. Let

mummy return from the hospital and let the new Shekar be a pleasant surprise for her, he planned.

 

Mummy  was  wheeled  into  the  theatre.  About  an  hour  later  an  emergency information  was  sent.  Mama’s heart  stopped, half-way through  the surgery.  They could not revive her.

 

“Ayyyooo, mummiee...” Shekar’s screams rent the air. “You left me without giving me a chance, mummieee. Will you not open your eyes for just a minute?” Shekar beat upon his breast and cried; his sister sobbed; his father wept with his head on his hands.

 

Mummy’s  enlarged  photograph  found  a place  on  the wall.  Her eyes  looked  at

Shekar lovingly but Shekar avoided her eyes.

 

His fingers played on the table-dust. He looked up— cobwebs! The dust he had not witnessed in sixteen years had gathered in sixteen days! All these days...mummy?

 

Shekar collected his clothes and went to the well to wash. After the Sunday Service when they returned home ma would cook and after lunch when everyone took a nap, he would hear her washing at the well. The memory of the sound gave him chest pain.

 

“Son, get up” - That voice was laid to rest. “Who will ever wake me up like that again?” Shekar thought. He felt his heart would burst. All the church friends said that God would not make a mistake. Even this is for good. Why did God snatch my mother away leaving my conscience to cry? What is the good in it? The house seemed empty. How she used to secretly put the cake pieces into her handbag and bring for him! The handbag, hanging on a nail swung gently in the breeze. Shekar felt like weeping on somebody’s shoulder.

 

Shekar joined a hostel. Now, exam or no exam he never started the day without reading the Bible or praying. Ragu became his friend.

 

“Hey Ragu, the senior gang is planning to go somewhere. Are you not joining?”

asked Shekar.

 

“The stupid woman will not leave me da.” It was like a whack on his chest for Shekar.

“What Ragu, what did you say? Who did you say?” Shekar’s voice trembled.

 

“One of the rules in our house is that we should not stay out after eight.” Ragu spat out the words.

 

Shekar threw his arms around Ragu’s shoulders. They both walked towards the college steps and seated themselves. Soon they were engrossed in serious talk.

 

Ragu’s life gradually turned around.

 

Ragu’s  mother  boasted,  “Since  Ragu  went  to  college  he  has  become  very responsible. He’s changed a lot. You know how much he loves me.”

 

Hearts changed...Lives  changed. God will not make a mistake. Out of Shekar’s sorrow was born something good!

 

The opportunity to share love is not any day, it is today!

 

 

  Address for Correspondence Contributions

Dr. Lilian Stanley
13 Church Colony
Vellore 632006, India
 +91 9843511943
  lilianstanley@gmail.com

Blessing Youth Mission

Blessing Youth Mission
13 Church Colony
Vellore 632006, India
 +91-416-2242943, +91-416-2248943
  hq@bymonline.org
  www.bymonline.org

For Donation & Contributions...

Home & NRE donors

Name: Blessing Youth Mission
Account Type: Current Account
A/c No.: 37268642054
Bank: State Bank of India
Branch: Siruthozhil,Vellore - 632 006
IFSC No.: SBIN0007274

Overseas Donors

Name: Blessing Youth Mission
A/c No.: 1074703964
Bank: Central Bank of India
Branch: Vellore
IFSC No.: CBIN0280887
MICR Code: 000016000
SWIFT Code: CBININBBMDR

Gulf Donors

A/c Name: T.Dickson Daniel Moses
Account Type: Saving Account
A/c No.: 35374362080
Bank: State Bank of India
Branch: Siruthozhil,Vellore - 632 006
IFSF: SBIN0007274

Click here for more options

  Blessing Literature Centre

To buy books written by Dr. Lilian Stanley, kindly reach to us in the follwing address

Blessing Literature Centre
21/11 West Coovam River Road,
Chintadripet,
Chennai 600 002, India.
 +91-44-28450411
  blc@bymonline.org